Winners of the Most Innovative Bridge category (L-R): Xuanyu Lin, Fahad Alabdullatif (centre), Rabnawaz Rustamkhail and Suneth Jayasingha.

A challenge to build a bridge from ten sheets of paper inspired students to come up with all kinds of interesting ideas.The science and engineering students, on A level and BTEC National Diploma courses, were asked to create a structure which would hold Bridge-innovative-UC-web-IMWinners of the Most Innovative Bridge category (L-R): Xuanyu Lin, Fahad Alabdullatif (centre), Rabnawaz Rustamkhail and Suneth Jayasingha.

A challenge to build a bridge from ten sheets of paper inspired students to come up with all kinds of interesting ideas.

The science and engineering students, on A level and BTEC National Diploma courses, were asked to create a structure which would hold as much weight as possible, during National Science and Engineering week.

The teams of three to five people had an hour to construct a free-standing structure across a gap of 20cm which would support a centrally placed load.  They could bend, fold, or cut the paper, or manipulate it in any mechanical way, but were not allowed to use any other materials such as glue or tape.  The judges included former student Adrian Timpson, now working at University College London, who helped oversee and plan the challenge.  The panel was completed by Dr Alastair Mullins, Head of The Academy, Uxbridge College’s sixth form centre, and Zafar Khan, Head of Engineering.

Prizes were awarded for the bridge with the highest score (calculated by dividing the mass the bridge could carry by the mass of the bridge), and for the most innovative design.  The highest scoring bridge was created by Hamed Nategh-Nouri, Joshua Shine and Vinton Thomas, who are studying for a BTEC National Diploma in Electrical/Electronic Engineering.  The most innovative bridge was built by A level students Fahad Alabdullatif, Suneth Jayasingha, Malik Hakeem, Xuanyu Lin and Rabnawaz Rustamkhail.

Dr Mullins said: “This was quite a challenge and the winners of both categories did some terrific work, solving the problem by applying their science and engineering skills in a creative way.  The highest scoring bridge weighed just under 50g but could carry more than 10kg of weight, and the structure we judged most innovative demonstrated excellent design which utlised both compressive and tensile strength of paper.”

Uxbridge College is now planning on making the paper bridge building contest an annual feature of events held as part of National Science and Engineering Week.

News

November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010