P1011253Uxbridge College’s science labs became the scene of a crime while Sir Isaac Newton gave lectures, students made bridges out of paper instead of writing on it, and women took centre stage as leaders in their professions.

These and other activities marked National Science & Engineering Week at the College, in one of the most wide-ranging programmes of events in the sector.

Activities included:

* Fingerprinting, investigating blood spatter, and evidence-gathering at a (fictitious) crime scene with former Scotland Yard Detective Chief Inspector Steve Gaskin, of Right Angle Education.

* A visit by Sir Isaac Newton clad in his traditional clothes (alias David Hall in a presentation by Johnny Ball Productions) and sharing fascinating facts about his life and achievements.

* A competition for student teams to build the strongest bridge out of paper.

* Workshops with women in science and engineering (WISE) including Dr Mariann Rand-Weaver, Pro-Vice Chancellor Brunel University; Alexandra Parsons from Skanska; and Dr Eve Abe, Ethologist and Zoologist.

* Workshops on particle physics, computational mathematics, careers in Medicine and geographic profiling were run by academics or students from Brunel, Queen Mary and Imperial College universities.

The event was supported by Nexen Petroleum UK, and Right Angle events also made a donation to the College to help support science education.

Ray Ferris, Director of Education for 14-19 year olds at Uxbridge College, and its lead on STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering & Maths), said: “Over the last three years Uxbridge College has developed one of the widest-ranging Science & Engineering Weeks across the college sector. The event is now a firm fixture in the College’s annual calendar and attracts enormous interest from students. I suppose this is not surprising when they have a murder to solve and get a chance to meet one of history’s greatest scientists brought back from the dead.

“Science and Engineering week is a great illustration of how these subjects not only encompass many of the most interesting facets of the past, present and future, but also offer routes into an enormous range of careers in thriving sectors.”

Dr Alastair Mullins, Head of the Academy at Uxbridge College, which teaches GCSEs, A levels and vocational science, said: “This was by far our best ever Science & Engineering week so far with around 1,200 students - a quarter of all full-time students at the College - taking part in one activity or another. Far from science, maths and engineering being niche subjects or the preserve of boffins, there is growing recognition that concepts from these areas not only underpin many other academic and vocational subjects, but contribute greatly to our understanding and appreciation of everyday experience.”

National Science & Engineering Week is run every March by the British Science Association to boost interest in science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) subjects.

News

December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010